This band uses children toys to play “Rage Against the Machine” cover “Killing in the name”

The band members, Blowmaster, Bongostar, and Speedfinger have also done children’s toy covers of “Enter Sandman” by Metallica, Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” and ACDC’s “Highway To Hell
According to the Wackids mission statement: “The Wackids are a rock band with a strong identity,” reads the group’s mission statement.

“Three superheroes dressed in red, yellow and blue, reinterpreting universal tunes on children’s instruments. In the same way that Angus Young always plays in school uniform or that Batman’s costume is always black and yellow with a cape.”

The Wackids are currently on tour, for more information visit their Facebook page!

You can watch the video below:


source  & Youtube

A Captive Dolphin Teaches ” Tail-Walking” To Other Dolphins In The Wild

We all know dolphins can learn all sorts of tricks when they’re in captivity.

But a new study has shown how they go on to teach tricks to each other in the wild, like ‘walking on water’.

The 30-year study, led by Whale and Dolphin Conservation with the universities of St Andrews and Exeter, looked at how the trick was learned by a single dolphin then copied by peers in the wild.

And then – like a human fad – the skill dies out, according to the research, which is published in the Royal Society’s ‘Biology Letters’.

According to the research, ‘tail walking’ rarely occurs in the wild but is standard in most routines taught to dolphins in captivity.

The study focused on Billie, one of the dolphins in WDC’s adoption programme, who was rescued from a polluted creek in January 1988, spending several weeks in a dolphinarium before being released back into the wild.

Billie appears to have learned tail walking by watching performing dolphins, continuing to do the trick when back in the wild.

Apparently soon after other dolphins in Billie’s local community began copying her behavior and by 2011 nine dolphins had been observed tail walking in the wild.

Despite the initial fad, after 2011 the number of dolphins tail walking in the wild declined with the most prolific tail walker dying in 2014, leaving only two but even they only performed the trick sporadically.

Lead author of the paper, WDC’s Dr. Mike Bossley, said it was only because he had been studying the Adelaide dolphins for more than 30 years that the significance of tail walking was recognized.

“I knew Billie’s history and was able to track her behavior and that of the other dolphins in the community over an extended period,” he said. “This enabled me to observe tail walking spread through the community and then its eventual fade away.”

University of St Andrews researcher Dr. Luke Rendell, a co-author who specializes on researching whale and dolphin cultural behavior, said: “Once again we see the power of being able to study cetaceans over extended periods that mean something given their lifespans. Dr. Bossley’s long-term commitment has afforded us a revealing insight into the potential social role of imitation in dolphin communities.”
source & youtube

 

 

An island in Brazil has so many snakes that humans aren’t allowed on it.

About 25 miles off the coast of Brazil, there is an island where no local would ever dare tread. Legend has it that the last fisherman who strayed too close to its shores was found days later adrift in his own boat, lifeless in a pool of blood.

The mysterious island is known as Ilha da Queimada Grande, and it is in fact so dangerous to set foot there that Brazil has made it illegal for anyone to visit. The danger on the island comes in the form of the golden lancehead snakes – a species of pit viper and one of the deadliest serpents in the world.

The lanceheads can grow to be over a foot-and-a-half long and it’s estimated that there are between 2,000 and 4,000 snakes on the island, which unsurprisingly is known as Snake Island. The lanceheads are so venomous that a human bitten by one could be dead within an hour.

Snake Island is uninhabited now, but people used to live there for a short period up to until the late 1920s when, according to legend, the local lighthouse keeper and his family were killed by vipers that slithered in through the windows. Today, the navy periodically visits the lighthouse for upkeep and makes sure no adventurers are wandering too close to the island.

Another local legend claims that the snakes were originally introduced by pirates seeking to protect buried treasure on the island.

In reality, the vipers’ presence is the result of rising sea levels – a less exciting origin story than paranoid pirates to be sure, but still interesting.

Snake Island used to be part of Brazil’s mainland, but when sea levels rose over 10,000 years ago, it separated the landmass and turned it into an island.

The animals that wound up isolated on Queimada Grande evolved differently from those on the mainland over the course of millennia, the golden lanceheads in particular. Since the island vipers had no prey but birds, mother nature helped them develop extra-potent venom so that they could almost immediately kill any bird. Local birds are too savvy to be caught by the many predators that inhabit the island and the snakes instead rely on birds who visit the island to rest as food.

Lancehead snakes, which are the golden lancheads’ mainland cousins, are responsible for 90 percent of all snake bites in Brazil. A bite from their golden relatives, whose venom is up to five times more potent, is less likely to actually happen due to their island isolation. However, such an encounter is far more likely to be lethal if it does happen. There are no fatality statistics of the golden lanceheads (since the only area they inhabit is cut off from the public), however, someone bitten by a regular lancehead faces a seven percent chance of death if untreated. Treatment does not even guarantee a lancehead bite victim will be saved: there is still a three percent mortality rate.

It’s hard to imagine why anyone would want to visit a place where a painful death lurks every few feet. However, the vipers’ deadly venom has shown potential in helping to combat heart problems. This has led to something of a black market demand for the venom. For some lawbreakers, the lure of the money is incentive enough to risk almost certain death on Queimada Grande.
source: business insider  NatGeo/Youtube