Your Pets are Just Livestock in These 10 Countries.

Although some of us have become so accustomed to some animals as pets that we no longer consider them as food, other people have no qualms about eating these animals, even if they have a similar animal as a pet. Here are some countries whose citizens will eat your favorite pet without a second thought.

1. Dogs


Dogs may be man’s best friends but not to some citizens of Switzerland, Vietnam, Nigeria, South Korea, Indonesia, Greenland, the Philippines, and China, who consider the animals as just livestock. In Switzerland, it is illegal to buy and sell dog meat. But there is no law against people killing and eating their own dogs. Several tribes living around the Arctic and Antarctic will also readily munch down on their dogs when food is low. In Vietnam, dog meat is the go-to meat during ceremonies. Demand is so high that dogs are now being stolen from the streets and homes of neighboring Thailand and smuggled into Vietnam.[1]If there is one place not to be a dog, it is South Korea. In that country, up to 2.5 million dogs are slaughtered and eaten every year. Following South Korea is the Philippines, where over 290,000 dogs are killed for human consumption annually. Dog meat used to be legal in the Philippines until the 1998 Animal Welfare Act banned it. However, the dog meat industry simply moved underground and business continued as usual. These days, it is worth over $4 million a year. The Lychee and Dog Meat Festival (aka the Yulin Dog Meat Festival) marks the height of consumption in China. Over 10,000 dogs and cats are eaten during the 10-day annual festival held in Guangxi province.

2. Monkeys


Monkey meat is called “bushmeat” in the parts of West and Central Africa where it is eaten. In the Republic of the Congo, it is called likaku and is usually sold in restaurants and at roadside stands. So many monkeys are being hunted to sate the appetites of monkey meat lovers that some species are already at the brink of extinction. It was believed that one subspecies, the Miss Waldron’s red colobus, had been hunted to extinction, but there may be a few still living in Africa. This subspecies is now considered to be “critically endangered.”Gorillas, bonobos, and chimpanzees are not safe from monkey meat hunters and consumers, either, as these animals are considered alternatives to monkeys. There are claims that fresh monkey brains are a delicacy in China and Malaysia. It is said that the head of the unfortunate monkey is split open and the brain is eaten straight from the skull. These claims have not been confirmed, but it could have happened in the past—and possibly still occurs today. However, we know that cooked monkey brains are eaten in countries in the Far East.

3. Cats


Cat meat is eaten in Vietnam, China, and Australia. Despite being illegal, it is considered a delicacy in Vietnam, where it is called “little tiger.” Cats destined to become little tigers are usually drowned in water before they are skinned, roasted, and seasoned. Thereafter, they are cut into pieces and downed with bottles of beer. The Vietnamese demand for cat meat is so high that the animals are now stolen from the homes of their owners in neighboring Thailand and Laos and smuggled into Vietnam. Cats in Vietnam are not spared, either. In fact, it is rare to find cats strolling along the streets of Hanoi where the owners have learned to lock these pets inside their homes lest they become little tigers. Vietnamese only started eating cats in the 20th century when a series of wars left them starving and forced them to eat whatever they could lay their hands on. This also included dogs, rats, and insects. Thieves are also fueling the cat meat industry in China where over four million unfortunate kitties are eaten every year. One thief was caught with over 500 cats he had stolen from the homes of their owners. The man, identified only as Sun, was selling the animals for a mere $4.40 a piece. Many Chinese were concerned when the news of the theft appeared on the Internet, although some were angrier about the cats being stolen rather than eaten. Felines are also eaten in Australia. Feral cats that have been wreaking havoc on Australia’s wildlife are the ones targeted for cooking pots. Australians no longer want these animals hanging around. What better way to get rid of them than just eating them? Other feral animals like pigeons and camels are also on the menu.

4. Horses 


Although most Americans frown at the idea of eating horse meat, it remains a delicacy in many countries, including neighboring Canada. In 2014, almost 67,000 horses were butchered for their meat in Canada, even though the bulk was shipped to the European Union, which considers horses as food-producing animals. In the Netherlands, horse meat is a key ingredient in making sandwiches. Looking south, over 128,000 horses are slaughtered in Mexico every year. Like Canada, the bulk of the meat is exported. But this time, it goes to several countries including Egypt, Hong Kong, Kazakhstan, Russia, Vietnam, and Japan. In Japan, horse meat is used in traditional dishes such as basashi. Interestingly, Mexicans are not totally fans of eating the product despite having a huge horse meat industry. However, it is normal for butchers to pass off this meat as beef. An investigation revealed that 10 percent of beef sold in five Mexican cities was actually horse meat.

5. Lizards


For reptile lovers, your favorite pet is just another food in parts of Asia and South America. Fried gecko is a delicacy in Indonesia, where it is loved for its supposed medicinal properties. It is also popular in China, where it is believed to shrink tumors. Gecko is said to taste like something between chicken meat and fish. Iguanas are not spared from cooking pots in El Salvador, Mexico, and Puerto Rico. Lots of these lizards also roam the streets and forests of Puerto Rico, where they were first introduced as pets in the 1970s. Some got into the wild and, considering their rapid rate of reproduction, quickly surpassed humans in population. There are more iguanas than people in Puerto Rico today. So Puerto Ricans have decided to eat the iguanas to keep their population low. The meat is said to taste like chicken, just better.

6. Snakes


The Chinese have been eating snake soup since the third century BC. The soup remained an exclusive treat for the rich until it became common throughout China in the 1700s. It is believed to cure arthritis, improve the skin, and promote blood circulation. The soup’s warmth is used to counter the winter cold, which is why it is often eaten then. These days, it is considered a delicacy in Hong Kong where it is called se gang. A typical snake soup contains as many as five different types of snakes. It is boiled with pork bone and chicken. Mushrooms, ginger, chrysanthemum leaves, and lemongrass are added for taste. The snake meat can also be fried or made into casseroles. The meat is said to look and taste like chicken except that it is a bit tougher. Hong Kong restaurants that serve snakes are called se wong (“snake king”). These eateries are slowly becoming a rarity in Hong Kong because the low wages paid in the industry are not enough to keep expert chefs and snake handlers committed to the preparation of the delicacy.

7. Mice 


Roasted mice are roadside delicacies in Zimbabwe and Malawi. In Zimbabwe, the rodents are caught with traps set in cornfields. The trapped mice are roasted and salted before being sold to commuters traveling to neighboring South Africa. In Malawi, they are called mbewa or roasted field mice. There, they are also caught in fields but without traps. Instead, children disturb corn husks, forcing the mice hiding underneath to attempt an escape. The children kill the escaping mice with sticks. At other times, the children set the entrance to the mouse nests on fire and kill any mice trying to escape. The animals are roasted, salted, and peppered. Then they are eaten whole, complete with the bones and everything else within.

8. Rats


Rats are a delicacy among members of the Adi tribe in India. Any kind will do—from regular house rats to those found in the forests. The Adi people even have an annual festival called Unying-Aran, which is celebrated with rat dishes. The animals can be roasted or made into bule-bulak oying stew that contains the rat’s entrails, tail, legs, and fetus. Rats are also eaten among the Dalit caste of India. The members of this caste, one of the country’s poorest, are even called “rat eaters” because they often cultivate the farms of a richer caste in exchange for killing any rats found there. The rodents are usually smoked and eaten whole. They are said to taste like quail or chicken. Rats are also eaten in Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, the Philippines, Indonesia, Thailand, Ghana, China, Vietnam, Nigeria, and Cameroon. The preferred breeds are the African giant rat in Nigeria and the equally big cane rat in Cameroon. The cane rat is the size of a small dog and is more expensive than chicken. It is said to taste like pork but is more tender.

9. Turtles

Turtle soup was popular in the US in the 1860s. It was even served at the second inauguration of President Abraham Lincoln in 1865. President William Howard Taft loved it so much that he selected the White House chef based on his ability to cook the soup. In the South, wealthy patrons hosted turtle soup parties called “turtle frolics.” The popularity of turtle soup made it so expensive that mock turtle soup was introduced. It was similar to the regular variety except that the turtle was replaced with the head of a calf. Mock turtle soup, which was served at Lincoln’s first inauguration, was also costly, though not as much as real turtle soup.[9]Both soups had almost completely disappeared in the US by the 1960s. Mock turtle soup is still sold in Cincinnati today, but it is made with ground beef. In China, turtle soup is believed to improve blood circulation, enhance kidney function, stop menstrual pains, and prolong life. As weird as it sounds, a good number of turtles used for Chinese turtle soup come from the US. In Arkansas, about 600,000 of these animals were killed for human consumption between 2004 and 2006. Over 106,000 kilograms (235,000 lb) of turtles were also harvested in Iowa in 2007. This is creating a problem in the US because turtles are being harvested faster than they are reproducing. Protected species like the alligator snapping turtle (Macrochelys temmickii) are not spared because they are being mistaken for their unprotected look-alike, the common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina).

10. Rabbits


Rabbits are the third most common mammals kept as pets in the United States. They used to double as livestock before and during World War II, but this stopped with the advent of large-scale farming. Little wonder that their reintroduction as food has generated controversy in the US. However, rabbits are just another meat in countries such as Cyprus, Italy, Malta, France, and China. In fact, China, the world’s largest supplier, produced 690,000 tons of rabbit meat in 2010. Of that, 10,000 tons were exported to several countries, especially Belgium, Germany, and the US. Rabbit meat is also common in the European Union, where about 326 million of the animals are slaughtered every year. These days, rabbit meat is promoted as a leaner alternative to chicken and beef in the US. But Americans are divided over whether they want their rabbits to double as livestock or just remain pets.
Source: listverse

Foods That You Can And Cannot Feed To Your Dogs

We know it’s best to avoid feeding man’s best friend with table scraps, but sometimes those puppy-dog eyes get the best of us and we can’t resist slipping them a treat from our plates.

But just because a food is good for us doesn’t necessarily mean it’s safe for dogs.

Here’s a list of dog-approved people foods, as well as some items you should never share with your canine companion.

Keep in mind though that every dog is different, so try these foods in small amounts, and if your dog has a reaction to any of them, consult a veterinarian.

Human Foods You CAN Give Your Dogs

  1. Peanut butter: Giving your dog the occasional tablespoon of unsalted peanut butter is a treat you can both enjoy. (Just make sure your brand of peanut butter doesn’t contain xylitol.) It’s a great source of protein and healthy fats for dogs, and it’s a perfect photo opportunity for you.
  2. Yogurt: High in protein and calcium, plain yogurt is an ideal treat for dogs, especially if your pooch suffers from digestion problems. Make sure you opt for yogurts that don’t contain added sugar or artificial sweeteners.
  3. Oatmeal: Oatmeal is a good source of fiber, making it great for dogs with bowel irregularity issues, and it’s also safe for dogs with wheat allergies. Before serving it to your pet, cook the oatmeal and don’t add any sugar.
  4. Chicken: If your dog requires extra protein in his diet, cooked, unseasoned chicken is an easy addition to his regular food. It also makes a good meal replacement if you’re out of dog food.
  5. Salmon: Dogs can benefit from omega 3 fatty acids too, so slip some cooked salmon into the food bowl for a healthier, shinier coat.
  6. Broccoli: This vitamin-rich vegetable can be a great occasional nutrition boost for dogs. However, it shouldn’t make up more than 10 percent of a dog’s diet as it could cause gastrointestinal irritation.
  7. Pumpkin: You can serve your dog pumpkin — raw or in a can — as a source of fiber or vitamin A. It’s also a helpful addition to doggie diets if your pooch is experiencing digestion problems.
  8. Green beans: Nutritious and low in calories, green beans are a good choice that will load dogs up with iron and vitamins. Make sure to feed your dog only fresh beans or canned ones with no added salt. Something to consider: Most types of beans contains a type of protein called lechtins that, depending on the amount, can cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea if not destroyed by cooking. Green beans only contain 5 to 10 percent of the lechtins in kidney beans, which cause the most problems, and green beans are typically safe when eaten raw. If you’re still concerned, you may want to cook your green beans before serving them to your dog (or your family).
  9. Cottage cheese: This bland food is high in calcium and protein, so it can be a good addition to dog food. However, avoid it if your dog has issues digesting dairy.
  10. Other cheese: In small quantities, cheese is a great treat for pets, says the American Kennel Club, as long as your dog isn’t lactose intolerant (which is rare for dogs, but possible). Choose lower-fat options like mozzarella.
  11. Carrots: This vegetable is low in calories and high in fiber and vitamins. Plus, crunching on carrots can be good for dogs’ teeth.
  12. Eggs: If your pooch needs a protein boost, scramble an occasional egg for a healthy snack. Eggs are high in protein, but they’re also high in fat, so don’t give your pet too many of them. Don’t feed raw or undercooked eggs to your dog, cautions the American Veterinary Medical Association. There’s the risk of contamination from bacteria such as salmonella, and that can make your dog sick.

 

Human Foods You CANNOT Give Your Dog

  1. Chocolate: You’ve likely heard that you’re never supposed to feed a dog chocolate, and there’s a reason for that. That delicious candy contains caffeine-like stimulants known as methylxanthines. If ingested in large amounts, chocolate can cause vomiting, diarrhea, irregular heartbeat, seizures and even death.
  2. Grapes and raisins: While this fruit is nutritious for you, it’s toxic to dogs and can cause kidney failure.
  3. Onions: They may make you cry, but they can make your dog very sick by causing damage to his red blood cells.
  4. Avocado: Avocado leaves, fruit, seeds and bark contain a toxin called persin that can cause upset stomach and breathing difficulties.
  5. Alcohol: Even drinking a small amount of alcohol can result in significant intoxication for a dog, which can lead to vomiting, seizures and even death.
    Source: Nedhardy

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15 Most Unusual Jobs

Plenty of people hate their jobs. That’s understandable – sitting at a desk and pounding on a keyboard for eight hours a day can be tedious. Luckily, not all jobs are boring. So if you’re looking for a new line of work that’s out of the ordinary, you can start your search here.

1. Profesional Mermaid

At first glance, you might think this is just a modeling job. But being a professional mermaid requires more than just looking good while posing. They have to learn to swim wearing the costume and hold their breath for a prolonged time. Sometimes they even have to share the water with live jellyfish and even sharks. Did you play Statues as a kid? You might be suited for this next job.

2. Live Mannequin

With the advent of online shopping, brick and mortar stores have been struggling to get customers in the door. Some clothing retailers have opted for creative ways to get shoppers’ attention, one of which is having real people as mannequins. The downside: posing perfectly still for a long time is not easy, and definitely not comfortable. If you’re a lazy person, this might just be your dream job.

3. Furniture Tester

Furniture testers are people who get paid to sit or lay down on beds, couches, chairs and other products to make sure they are comfortable. When testing beds you may even get to sleep on the job since mattress manufacturers have to make sure their merchandise is comfortable enough to fall asleep on. You may also need a bed to do this next job…

4. Adult Toy Tester

This job is not for the prudish. Adult toys are a big industry, and any product made at such scale needs to be tested for quality. Here’s where you come in. Manufacturers will send you their items and you’ll have to try them, then rate them for ‘fulfillment’ using a scale provided by the company. You’ll want to thank these guys next time you’re stuck in an elevator with a lot of people.

5. Armpit Sniffer

Deodorant manufacturers employ “armpit sniffers” to smell their products on subjects who’ve spent time in a hot room or exercising. Sometimes they have to sniff up to 60 armpits per hour. But they perform a public service: making sure the deodorant actually does what it’s supposed to: prevent funky smells. Thanks to this new line of work, you might not be forever alone after all.

6. Professional Cuddler

In today’s extremely tech-driven world, some people can get lonely. They might just crave human touch, without any romantic or sexual components. Well, now there are people who can provide that service. For a fee, they’ll come to your house and spoon, caress, hug or nuzzle with you. The golden rule though: no sexual contact. If cuddling is not your thing, you can also touch people at this job.

7. Face Feeler

Beauty brands know facial products that achieve smooth, soft skin can be best-sellers. So part of their production process now includes “face feelers”. These people’s job is to touch a person’s skin before and after they’ve applied a certain product. It takes skill to know the difference, so not everybody can do this job. You may not find this job appealing… unless you have a fearless palate.

8. Stunt Tester

Fear Factor and other game shows often make people eat disgusting things – it’s part of the program’s draw. These meals are not what people regularly eat, but producers still have to make sure they’re safe to consume. Stunt testers eat live bugs and other unpleasant things, which can pose a health hazard – but they are well compensated for the risk. Ever wondered where bait shops get their inventory from?

9. Worm Picker

If you like fishing, you’ll know live bait is best. Luckily, there are many bait shops you can go to for the freshest earthworm catch of the day. Worm pickers get paid by these shops to walk around gardens, parks and other grassy areas after dark to find the worms as they come up to the surface. Though if being indoors is more your thing, here’s a job for you.

10. Nude Model

One of the most common subjects of art is the human body. But learning how to draw or paint it is not as easy as looking at a photograph. So most art schools employ nude models to pose for their students, sometimes having to hold a pose for hours. Luckily you don’t need a perfect body, just confidence, and endurance. If you have a diving certificate, you could make big bucks in this job.

11. Golf Ball Diver

Golf courses seem to be rife with ponds and sand traps. With balls veering off-course every day, it’s a wonder they don’t overflow. That’s because golf courses pay divers to go into ponds and retrieve the balls from the bottom. This may sound easy, but you have to deal with dirty water, algae, and even snakes. Have you ever tried your dog’s food? You might want to, to prepare for this job.

12. Pet Food Tester

If you’ve ever tried your dog’s food, you’ll know it’s not exactly a delicacy. But some people will endure the taste of pet food if it pays well enough. They have to evaluate the products for texture, consistency, and flavor, though obviously not for the human palate. So now you know who to thank for having a happy, well-fed dog. For the next job, you won’t need to use your tongue, but your nose will be overworked.

13. Paper Towel Sniffer

You can’t be too careful with a product that’s supposed to be near people’s nostrils. Paper towel sniffers get paid, literally, to smell tissues and other paper hygiene products to make sure the odor is pleasant, or at least not undesirable. It pays surprisingly well, so there’s always plenty of applicants on the waitlist. Remember the last time you stood in line for something? Now you can hire someone to save you the trouble.

14. Line Stander

Whether it’s a fancy new iPhone or your favorite movie’s prized collectibles, there are products people will pay big money to obtain. That includes standing in line to get them – and luckily there are those who are willing to stand for 20 hours in your place. For a fee, of course. Ever got stuck halfway down a water slide? These people make sure that doesn’t happen.

15. Water Slide Tester

Building a water slide takes a lot of physics and engineering knowledge, but some things you can’t improve until you try them. That’s where this job comes in. Waterslide testers make sure these slides are safe, have enough water, and don’t thrust people down too fast. So next time you’re at a water park with your kids, you know who to thank.

Source: thebuzztube