Five baby squirrels tied together by their tails rescued after being found.

Five infant squirrels have been rescued after being found tied together by their tails.

The entanglement is thought to have happened by chance with the giant knot forming as the young greys moved about their nest and each other.

Grass, twigs, and bits of plastic had also become interwoven into the entanglement.

A member of the public discovered the bizarre scene in Wisconsin, in the US, on Wednesday, and took them to the Wildlife Rehabilitation Center at the state’s Humane Society – where vets worked to get them free.

“You can imagine how wiggly and unruly (and nippy!) this frightened, distressed ball of squirrelly energy was, so our first step was to anesthetize all five of them at the same time,” officials wrote on Facebook.

With the animals out cold, vets spent 20 minutes unraveling what they called a “Gordian knot” of squirrel and nest material.

“It was impossible to tell whose tail was whose, and we were increasingly concerned because all of them had suffered from varying degrees of tissue damage to their tails caused by circulatory impairment,” the center wrote.

But once loose, it said, the squirrels were left apparently unaffected by the tangle.
(source)

Gorgeous Animals With Unique Markings

The animals below have some of the coolest, most unique,  markings I’ve ever seen on animals. Some of these guys are pets. Some are wild animals, out there in the jungle or the desert flaunting their stylish markings for the world to see.

Heart Eyes


Look at this precious Dalmatian with perfect little hearts around both of his eyes!

Eyebrows


This pup has some bold and brash eyebrows, which is awesome because they are totally in style.

Mustachioed


This handsome mustachioed fella is Hamilton the Hipster Cat. That’s right. He has his own Facebook page and everything.

Inky feet


This dog looks like he waded through a vat of black ink! But his markings are totally natural.

Baby Cow


The most amazing thing about this young calf that clearly has the number “7” on its face is that his siblings all have 1-6.

Tiny top hat


First of all, this kitten is ridiculous. It has this perfectly round face and giant eyes, but on top of that, it’s got this little black marking that looks just like a top hat!

Smile dog


This little pup resembles a certain Batman villain…

Halfsies


You might think this was two different parakeets if you just saw this bird’s profiles. This parakeet is chimeric, which means it has a mixture of different genetic tissues that come from two fertilized eggs that fused together in the womb.

Pink katydid


This bright pink katydid isn’t painted. This color can occur naturally in animals due to a condition called Erythrism.

Trippy Turtle

Look at this gorgeous creature! This turtle is leucistic, which is a condition in animals where they don’t have pigmentation in certain areas on their body but still have color in some places.

Dick the Dog


I think it’s pretty clear what this very unique marking on the back of this Jack Russell terrier looks like.

Two faced


Not only does this cat have a perfect line down the middle of its face, but its eyes are two different colors as well! Amazing.

Oh, deer!


Look at this precious baby deer! If I saw this little one in the wild, I would try to feed it berries from my hand.

Crazy Toad


This is a very rare, endangered species of toad from Costa Rica.

A star is born

This pretty pup with a star on her back is a Beagle/Cocker Spaniel mix named Regal Ruby Rose. You can follow her adventures on Instagram, and you probably should.

Last but not least, this little puppy with a heart on its back.

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Workers still search for 9/11 remains, 17 years later.

Seventeen years later, more than 1,100 victims of the hijacked plane attacks on the World Trade Center have yet to be identified.

But in a New York lab, a team is still avidly working to identify the remains, with technological progress on its side. Day in, day out, they repeat the same protocol dozens of times.

Sally Regenhard, who lost her son on 9/11, speaks at a news conference with other family members in New York on May 26, 2014.

At first, they examine a bone fragment found in the wreckage of the Twin Towers. It has yet to be matched to DNA.

Cut and ground to a fine dust, the remains are then mixed with two chemical products that can expose and then extract DNA. But success is not guaranteed.

“The bone is the hardest biological material to work with,” said Mark Desire, assistant director of forensic biology at the Office of Chief Medical Examiner in New York.

“And, on top of that, when they’re exposed to things that were present at Ground Zero, fire, mold, bacteria, sunlight, jet fuel, diesel fuel, all these destroy DNA. So you could physically have a sample with very very small amounts of DNA there.”

The 22,000 pieces of human remains found at the site since the attacks have all been tested — some 10 or 15 times already.

A flag used at the closing ceremony of Ground Zero and a traditional style FDNY “stokes basket” used to carry out the remains of thousands who died on 9/11 is displayed at the 9/11 Tribute Museum in New York on June 12, 2017.

So far, only 1,642 of the 2,753 people who died in the attacks in New York have been formally identified. The 1,111 others have yet to yield identifiable information.

Several years have sometimes passed without the lab adding a name. But no one is giving up.

“These are all the same protocol that we had in 2001, but we were able to improve the process for each of the steps, out of necessity,” Desire said.

He refused to confirm the program’s budget, but it is the best equipped and advanced lab in North America.

– Emotion –

In July, almost a year after the last identification, the lab added another name to the list — Scott Michael Johnson, a 26-year-old financial analyst who had been working on the 89th floor of the South Tower.

“I felt really good about it,” said Veronica Cano, one of the team’s criminalists.

“We are trained to not be affected, but we do get affected by it because it’s something that affects everyone in some way. But I try to be professional and try to bring closure to the families.”

The lab only dedicates part of its work to 9/11 identification and handles other deaths and disappearances.

The team’s work takes place in separate offices located about 1.3 miles (two kilometers) from what was once known as Ground Zero.

Families of victims sometimes stop by the lab.

“It’s hard not to be emotional because of the hugs and the thank yous,” said Cano.

“It’s very rewarding for me that I’m doing something for someone.”

The role of relatives is critical in technical terms because the only comparison of the DNA of the remains with a sample provided by the families can allow identification.

The forensic examiner’s office holds about 17,000 samples, but none for about 100 victims, which makes it a vain effort to pursue identification for those remains.

A very precise procedure allows relatives to decide if and how they will be informed of the identification of the loved one they lost.

“When you’re notified, it brings you back to that day, the horrific way that they died,” said Mary Fetchet, who lost her 24-year-old son Brad when the towers that once dotted New York’s skyline came crashing down.

“But it also gives you some solace that you’re able to give your loved one a proper burial.”

Fetchet co-founded Voices of September 11th, a group that helps address the long-term needs of those impacted by 9/11 and other tragedies.

In Manhattan, Desire is the only original member of the forensic team still working on the project.

“This has defined my career,” he said, a twinkle in his eye as he speaks of new technologies he’s impatient to use to test the remains.

“We’re very close with the families and that’s uncommon for forensic scientists. We’re all trained to be impartial, to be unbiased, to not get emotional. But the World Trade Center is different.”

In 2001, the head of the forensic office, Charles Hirsch, understood that time would be an ally in the effort to identify the remains, and he ordered that all the remains be conserved.

Teams from all over the world — from Argentina to South Africa — now come to New York to learn from the team.

When meeting with families of the victims, Desire said the team talks “about the future, what we’re working on right now that helps to make more identifications.”

Those who today serve as experts in his lab “were probably in elementary or grade school at the time” of the attacks, Desire said with a smile.

“But they see how important it is.”
(source)